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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 12

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. John's little boy comes _____ with the funniest things. You never know what he's going to say next.
off
out
away
on





2. I don´t know where I've seen him before, but it´ll come _____ me in a moment.
to
in
on
over





3. Pete's coming _____ later to drop off that CD you wanted to borrow.
in
off
on
round





4. Nobody knows how he came _____ his personal fortune. It´s all a bit of a mystery.
over
off
by
on





5. Depending on the backlog of cases, his case should come _____ the courts some time next month.
up
before
on
into





6. The man suddenly came _____ us with a knife. We had done nothing to provoke him.
at
over
off
on





7. I don´t think any concrete proposals will come _____ the environmental conference. None of the participants seem willing to make meaningful concessions.
to
from
over
off





8. A button has come _____ my shirt. I´ll have to sew it back on at some point.
apart
down
off
away





9. Sorry to cancel on you at such short notice, but I´m afraid something rather important has come _____ and I can't get out of it.
up
out
off
upon





10. A lot of people are coming _____ _____ this flu that's doing the rounds.
off with
down from
up with
down with